Neglecting the Full Truth

I finished up Harry Potter 5 a couple of weeks ago, and there was this one discourse between Dumbledore and Harry that stuck out to me so much that I wanted to share it with you:

     “Do you see, Harry? Do you see the flaw in my brilliant plan now? I had fallen into the trap I had foreseen, that I had told myself I could avoid, that I must avoid.”
     “I don’t -“
     “I cared about you too much,” said Dumbledore simply. “I cared more for your happiness than your knowing the truth, more for your peace of mind than my plan, more for your life than the lives that might be lost if the plan failed. In other words, I acted exactly as Voldemort expects we fools who love to act.
      “Is there a defense? I defy anyone who has watched you as I have – and I have watched you more closely than you can have imagined – not to want to save you more pain than you had already suffered. What did I care if numbers of nameless and faceless people and creatures were slaughtered in the vague future, if in the here and now you were alive, and well, and happy? I never dreamed that I would have such a person on my hands.”

I find this to reveal what I find myself feeling so often when working with youth. Sometimes the full truth is as tough to tell as it is to hear. As a spiritual leader I hate talking about hell or the truth of what will happen to a youth if they continue on the path that they’re on or telling a parent the truth about what their teen has been up to.   A partial truth is at times so much easier, but undoubtedly, you’ll end up with a regret-laden discussion with the one you withheld the full truth from – like Dumbledore.  It’s just another symptom of the part of our fallen nature that doesn’t want to ruffle feathers and just be a man-pleaser.  I want to be a spiritual leader known for my integrity – known for the fact that I’d rather be a God-pleaser than a man-pleaser – no matter how hard the “full” truth is to tell.

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One Response to Neglecting the Full Truth

  1. real live preacher says:

    This is the dilemma of all gentle and caring people. I submit it’s better than the dilemma of those who don’t really care much for individuals and don’t mind delivering hard news. Maybe even like it.

    But it is a dilemma.

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